Author: humanmetricsinc

Will my workplace benefit from a learning culture?

Will my workplace benefit from a learning culture?

Most people want to be learning, and doing so at least a portion of every day, even if they don’t realize it. Learning keeps people interested (and interesting – but that’s for a different article!) and engaged in their lives and in their work. Employees are quite aware of when they are no longer learning; once that happens, it’s as if a countdown clock appears above their heads that is clicking towards the time when they will be moving on. Continue reading “Will my workplace benefit from a learning culture?”

A Positive Employee Lifecycle Starts with Your Hiring Process

A Positive Employee Lifecycle Starts with Your Hiring Process

To state the glaringly obvious: every candidate you hire becomes your employee. Now consider this: before they get a company email address and computer, before meeting with HR for paperwork, before the “first day lunch” with the team, the new employee has already experienced some aspects of what it’s like to work at your company. Continue reading “A Positive Employee Lifecycle Starts with Your Hiring Process”

Are Your Managers Setup for Failure?

Are Your Managers Setup for Failure?

The most common factor that pushes employees out the door is their relationship (or lack thereof) with their manager. This is despite the fact that the employee may actually like their job or their company. It makes sense when you consider that an employee’s manager is their most frequent and important connection to your company. If the manager and employee don’t get along, then the employee’s options to improve the situation are limited, and it’s usually easier for them to throw in the towel and move on.
This situation places tremendous pressure on managers to maintain strong relationships with their employees while simultaneously getting their “real” job done (e.g., closing sales, completing projects on time). The pressure travels up to human resources representatives who are responsible for filling open positions, maintaining company engagement numbers, and frequently “keeping the peace” between managers and employees. Continue reading “Are Your Managers Setup for Failure?”

Your Next Leader May Be an Introvert

Your Next Leader May Be an Introvert

You did your research into best practices in leadership and performance management and you ensured your managers follow these practices. You carefully assess employees before they’re hired, and you promote those who show the most promise. In doing all of this, is it possible you are overlooking introverts and could this be hurting your bottom line?
Let’s get something out the way: Introverts are not necessarily shy and they don’t all want to be left alone. Extraverts are not all comfortable talking to large crowds and they sometimes want to be left alone. Introverts “gain energy” predominately from within, while extraverts tend to gain their energy from being around others. Continue reading “Your Next Leader May Be an Introvert”